I watch in wonder as if it’s my first time to witness all the glory that is a sunrise over tropical waters. Yes, it’s a daily event, and one I fear many miss out on. I watch the iridescent even glow of the sky fade from a dark glowing blue into an explosion of beautiful hues. These new colors seem to melt together and increase in intensity. All tones of Blues, fiery oranges, hints of reds so powerful it stirs the soul, and hues of pink that I’m afraid the english dictionary lacks the words to describe.

I dip my paddle into the water again, first the right, then left. I barely hear swish and swirling disturbance as I pull the paddle back towards me. Only a faint splash is heard as one blade comes free from the warm tropical water and the other dips in. My attention still focused on the heavens as that bright orange sphere breaks the seal on the horizon and begins to rise in all its beauty. I greet it with a smile, as if I were acknowledging an old friend from afar.

I glance over my shoulder to watch the stern lights of the drop-off skiff now cruising on-step back towards the faint glow of San Pedro. Armed with my water proof map of the days flats I pass between a sandbar and a small point of the tip of this intricate maze of undisturbed flats that are sacred grounds to all that enjoy the hunt of saltwater fly fishing. Occasionally I feel one of the blades of the paddle touch silt or sand. With the increasing light I can see the bottom a mere 5 to 7 inches below me. Gliding further into the opened flats the water deepens and I begin seeing dark patches of turtle grass. I’m now into the first in a series of flats and mangrove fats areas that are linked together by a network of channels that run so shallow they have protected their inhabitants from guides, noisy two strokes, the film of a fuel slick resting atop the water, and constant worries of food turning out to be a fly.

With good light now higher in the sky I lay my paddle across my lap. I observe the beauty of my surroundings and what I consider to be one of God’s best accomplishments next to the “act of” human reproduction. From the corner of my eye I spot the first sign of a disturbance in this otherwise unspoiled paradise. Focusing on the commotion I see the day’s first sign of tailing bones happily feeding. Noses down, attention in the sand searching food. I plot my approach as I study their direction of travel and feeding pattern. I aim the kayak up-wind and glide in like a stealth injection molded torpedo. I quietly engage the scupper levers and deploy the automatic expanding outriggers on this specially designed fishing kayak. I raise the casting bar and pull my self up on my feet. For a moment I contemplate the advancements made in fishing kayaks that enable a secure and stable standing and casting platform from a kayak. I grab my rod and strip off forty to fifty feet of line. I release the fly pinched between my forefinger and thumb. Watching it to the water just in front of me. My target selected, a good-sized bone that’s a few feet to the side of the rest of the school. Drawing back I wait, I wait for the loading of the rod. With a flip f my wrist the line is hurled forward. I haul again as I bring it back and again wait for the feeling. Again I haul and flip my wrist forward. This time 50 feet of line unfurrell in front of me moving on course towards the spot I’ve picked. I lower my rod tip towards the water and watch the fly gingerly touch down on the water and begin sinking. My selected quarry snubs his nose at my fly and proceeds on his hunt for food past my fly.

The first cast wasn’t a success. By the third I was hooked up and the chase was on. The day’s game of wading, stalking, and kayaking these untouched “honey holes” have begun. With the lack of man’s presences and pressure on these flats it has made the fish super aggressive. Through out the day I catch a total of fourteen bones and the largest weighing in around seven pounds. Not only has the lack of pressure provide more productive fishing, it also provides larger fish as well.

What I’ve described is a typical days fishing with a Belize fishing company called BITE ME! Belize Fishing Adventures. The boys at BITE ME! Came up with their unique style of flats fishing in Belize by shear frustration. “We kept running into these flats areas where we couldn’t pole into with the boats. We could wade due to knee-deep silt and mud bottoms. But we could see the fish, Tons of tails splashing about 70, 80, even a mere 100 yards ahead of us.” Says Jim Big “D” Harper one of the owners of BITE ME!.

This was the catalyst that spawned the first kayak fishing service in Belize. “In starting it we found we were catching more and larger fish in areas that once we got into them they opened up to these large flats with limestone and sand bottoms that you could wade.”

It also created an opportunity to allow others who previously couldn’t afford to experience a fishing trip to Belize due to the average cost for a week of fishing in Belize ranging between $2,700 per week to over $4,000 per week, per person as well. Due to the shuttle service by skiff to and from different networks of flats each day and not having a guide. The cost of fishing in Belize for an entire week with BITE ME!  Is $850 per week all-inclusive. After my experience with kayak fishing for bonefish I’ll certainly be heading back down soon. This is truly a remarkable and productive way to experience the joys of fishing in Belize. If you wish to discover more about kayak fishing in Belize visit Big “D” at http://www.BiteMeBelize.com

Advertisements